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Posts tagged with "fat"

ok so here's a thing, fat friends

fancybidet:

If you’re a smaller fat person and you embrace the word fat and use it descriptively and lovingly, that’s awesome. I just hope that you think about your big fat friends who can’t use weight limited gym equipment, are denied visas to countries, denied life saving operations, and can’t physically fit into this every day world leading them to live isolated and distressing existences.

I would hope that you’re totally cool with your privileges and that when it comes to taking up space in fat activism, there are marginalised experiences we need to talk about OTHER than how hard it is to find clothes (although that is important too!) and our fat friends on the super awesome deathfat end of the spectrum need a place to talk about the things that make it hard for them to live and thrive every day (including other intersecting oppressions!)

Apr 7

There is little precedent for fat androgyny. Generally our androgynous icons are svelte and lacking in secondary sex characteristics. David Bowie, Tilda Swinton, Katherine Hepburn; these small-bodied, predominately white figures of androgyny have created an aesthetic with little room for deviation. This means that for those of us with bodies that do not conform to traditional standards of androgyny, we are often misread and misunderstood, even in queer spaces.

- Fat Queer Tells All: On Fatness and Gender Flatness - By Allie Shyer (via heyfatchick)

(Source: otipemisiwak)

Feb 3

heyfatchick:

Amber Riley

(Source: vanderhastings)

cabell:

alanisabutt:

razzledazzy:

missproxy:

riotisabasterd:

Where do I sign up to be an evil henchman?

hades

oh good lord

scaarrrrrr

holy fuck son of shit

DAYUM

no geordin don’t rant about how they thinned ursula and PEOPLE ARE BEAUTIFUL AT EVERY SIZE no don’t do it

That was what *I* was going to say.  Villains are cool, apparently, but the artist draws the line at *gasp* FAT PEOPLE.

Also, is there a reason that Scar isn’t, you know, African if he’s going to be human?  (Just to be clear, I know that the reason is anti-Black racism.)

I want to hate this cause it’s problematic but so pretty :(

Positivity – not just for the dying

Just a quick thought. But – even if there was a proven causation between fat and all the ills of mankind (it’s blamed for everything from cancer to ingrown hairs after all) I would still not try to lose weight.

Why? Because dammit I’ve been there and done that and I am sick and tired of the negativity that you have to embrace to think that way. Sick and tired of seeing my body and it’s defences against famine as an enemy. Sick and tired of having to concentrate so strongly on everything I put in my mouth, worrying about whether that cracker has too much cheese on it and making myself drink water to disguise the fact I’m hungry. Sick and tired of expending all my energy to try and fail to meet the expectations of others while those others simultaneously chastise me for not doing so (they can tell, you see, because I continue to be fat). So y’know what? Even if all the current research goes up in ashes and HAES is turned on it’s head I don’t care – I will continue to live my life fat and free.

But I want to know what blip it is in our collective psyches that allows us only to let go of those negative judgement when we’re dying? Think about it. The only group of people in our Western Civilisation who are told to throw caution to the winds – to live as though there is no tomorrow, to be happy in and with the moment, to cease judgement and just be – are those who don’t have long to live. Why don’t we embrace that philosophy a little sooner? Why don’t we live our lives in the moment, as we are right this second, without thinking of how we could be ‘better’?

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Positivity – not just for the dying « Woman On Hold (via fridayfelts)

No amount of “health” lets us escape our inevitable end.  (#depressingthoughtfortoday) So we should be good to ourselves today!

Sex and fatness have a lot in common, actually. Aside from the fact that you’re not supposed to have either one-and if you do- you’re not supposed to admit it or, God forbid, enjoy it-they also both have a lot to do with appetites and desires, the body and our relationships to it, and our deep-seated emotional desires for acceptance and love. Put sex and fatness together, and it can open up what seems like a bottomless pit of issues.

-

Big Big Love by Hanne Blank (via chubadubdub)

I’m buying this book really soon thanks to a gift card from my aunt! 

(via donotcallmeashley)

Oh my gosh, what is this book?! I must have it!

(via unknowablewoman)

heyfatchick:

fatpeopleofcolor:

fullfiguredpotential:

Jill Scott performing at the 2011 BET Awards

[Image Description: Jill Scott in standing in spotlight onstage, performing. She has her hair styled medium to short, black, and parted at the side with most of it falling to one side. She is wearing a bright red glittery dress that has fringe around the hips and bottom half of the knee-length dress with black high heeled shoes. She is standing with her hips cocked to one side, hands on her thighs like she is keeping the beat of the music.]

Holy shit, Jill.

And then the club burst into flame.

heyfatchick:

fatpeopleofcolor:

fullfiguredpotential:

Jill Scott performing at the 2011 BET Awards

[Image Description: Jill Scott in standing in spotlight onstage, performing. She has her hair styled medium to short, black, and parted at the side with most of it falling to one side. She is wearing a bright red glittery dress that has fringe around the hips and bottom half of the knee-length dress with black high heeled shoes. She is standing with her hips cocked to one side, hands on her thighs like she is keeping the beat of the music.]

Holy shit, Jill.

And then the club burst into flame.

tangledupinlace:

fatmolly:

Two collages I created for my merchandising group project focusing on plus sized women’s fashion. The first is dedicated to the fashion rules against fat women and how we can pull them off fantastically (horizontal stripes, crop tops, mini skirts, skinny pants, bold prints). The second shows current trends on plus sized bodies (leopard print, florals, color blocking, sheer).

Most of the images I chose are from fat fashion bloggers (aside from three?). I hope everyone in these collages are okay with the fact that I used their photo for my class project.

love it! what a load of babes

tangledupinlace:

whatgiselawore:

giselaramirez:

GISELA RAMIREZ RUNWAY SHOW 2011 TEASER!

“Good evening and welcome to the official launch of Gisela Ramirez’s first plus size collection.

I met Gisela on the internet almost a year ago. I liked her immediately – she’s a very cool chick and is seriously passionate about what she does. When I heard she was designing a line, it’s fair to say I was a wee bit excited. I knew that her line, however it turned out, would go some way to filling the sizeable gap in plus size fashion.

Despite how frivilous it may sometimes seem, I do think fashion is important and can be quite political. The way we present ourselves through our clothes sends a message about us before we even open our mouths.

The limited options available in plus sizes – especially in Australia – mean that the messages we are able to send with our fashion are, in a way, censored. It is much easier to think of fat women as homely and sexless when the fashion choices available are largely homely and sexless.

The bulk of plus size fashion caters to our insecurities. It assumes that we all must be ashamed of our arms, our bellies and our arses. That our sartorial goals only revolve around flattering our figure.

The idea of a ‘flattering’ outfit being one that highlights my good parts while minimising my flaws. Beyond the fact that no waist-cinching belt will transform me into a size 10, what the designers of ‘flattering’ garments fail to realise is that all my parts are good parts. I can’t minimise my flaws because I have no flaws.

When writing this speech, I was looking through the first emails Gisela and I sent to each other. All those months ago, she said to me that she designs for the “type of girl [who] isn’t hung up on her body, is confident enough to stand out in a crowd and wants to be the centre of attention.”

Now how amazing is that?

In an industry that tells fat girls ‘Don’t draw attention, don’t wear bright colours, don’t wear tight clothes but don’t wear shapeless sacks either’, Gisela Ramirez has created a line from superhero spandex and sheer silk chiffon.

That’s what’s so exciting about this new collection. She caters for the middle fingers. For those of us who wear our freak on the outside. Who don’t walk when we can strut.

Gisela is not flattering our figures with these clothes. She’s going one better. She is embracing our bodies. She knows that when our clothes send the world a message, we should be the ones dictating it. The main message for tonight? Fuck flattering.

The amazing words of Frances Lockie, (Heyfatchick & Corpulent) who I am so proud to call my friend, and who I was lucky enough to have open my show, with this bold speech, on the 19th of August 2011.

http://corpulent.wordpress.com/2011/08/20/gisela-ramirez-launch-short/

I think it’s terribly important for people to know the meaning behind “Fuck Flattering”

It seems to me that more and more, people tend to form an opinion about something without bothering to find out the intention!

Fuck flattering does not mean I don’t care about looking good, about looking stylish or about looking beautiful. It simply means I get to decide what I wear, what is stylish for me and what makes ME feel beautiful, not the media, not magazines, not some “make over show” on the television.

This is the message you should have been given instead of all the times you’ve been told not to wear a particular style or colour or shape or direction of stripe.

Fuck -what they tell you is ‘flattering’ for your body/shape/colour/height… Wear what YOU want to wear, without apologies!

-Gisela

this made me so emotional. love you two babes with all my heart

piddlebucket:

heyfatchick:

ourchangingsky:

c’mon youuuu guyzzzz, wait for me!

This is fantastic.

ok i love you

piddlebucket:

heyfatchick:

ourchangingsky:

c’mon youuuu guyzzzz, wait for me!

This is fantastic.

ok i love you

piddlebucket:

anarchofeminist:

(via fuckyeahfatpositive, bearsimjealousof)

piddlebucket:

anarchofeminist:

(via fuckyeahfatpositive, bearsimjealousof)

Today I smelled the patriarchy

fatandtheivy:

And it’s the smell of your own flesh.  A woman lies on an operating room table.  She’s been given a light sedative and a local anesthetic.  She came in this morning in search of beauty, and now she’s finding that beauty really is pain.  Tears quietly stream down her face as she beings to shake uncontrollably from the pain.  The plastic surgeon continues to cauterize the fresh wounds above her eyes that will hopefully heal and become upper eyelid folds.  I can smell her seared flesh, and I know that she can too.  Despite her most valiant efforts at controlling herself, she moans and lets out muffled shrieks of pain. I step out of the room and wipe tears from my eyes.  

Today I smelled the patriarchy, and it’s the smell of human flesh.  Cannibalism in it’s most pristine form.  

Horrifying.

Me and the Industry: My fight with Body Image, Feminism, and Making it Big

So I find myself constantly at odds with these two parts of me: the feminist blogger who eschews the false norms of beauty that are plastered all over every form of media we’re exposed to, and the aspiring musician who understands the reality of marketing when you yourself are the product. Yes, a big part of the reason I’m finally losing the weight is because I’m actually pursuing my music career now. But I also don’t feel good about myself. Does that count as doing this for me, or am I too inundated with unrealistic goals of what beauty is to truly change my appearance in any way that is “for me”? Before I began trying to lose this weight (officially as of one week ago), I was basically sedentary and took no notice of what I was eating or how much. So this will undoubtedly have a positive effect on my health – does that count as a plus? How do I decide between the crippling dissatisfaction with what my body is now compared to what it used to be –and my god, I’m only 21, how has so much deterioration taken place already!– and the horrific guilt of having these feelings while simultaneously skewering this kind of low self-esteem? Why do I genuinely find so many women of large size so physically beautiful, but hate my own body? And the big one: does this make me a bad feminist?

I don’t feel the author is a bad feminist at all, but I’m kind of disappointed by this article.  I appreciate that the author is honest about her struggles, but in the end she says “Welp, I’d better lose weight because society wants me to.”  Getting active is great, and it’s wonderful that she feels better!  But I think she might want to put more effort into accepting and loving her body, the way it is right now.  Which is, admittedly, very hard.

#mytwocents

Jul 9

As a fat activist, I often want to say, “But I’m healthy! Look, I eat my veggies and exercise.” While it’s fun to flout stereotypes, social justice is unacceptably precarious if it depends on good behavior, or on access to other flavors of unearned privilege. For example, gaining respect for fat people who happen to be rich or healthy or white or able-bodied at the expense of other fat people is just more yuck, not yum. Human rights should be based on the fact that we’re all here, not on some begrudging notion that some of us should or would change if we could.

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Marilyn Wann, “A ‘Big, Fat Parade’ Could Expand Livable Space for All of Us”

http://blogs.sfweekly.com/exhibitionist/2011/07/a_fat_pride_parade_could_expan.php